International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2013, Vol. 9(2) 21-33

When New Media Meet the Strong Web of Connected Learning Environments: A New Vision of Progressive Education in the Digital Age

Chaebong Nam

pp. 21 - 33   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2013.019

Published online: June 15, 2013  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 21


Abstract

This paper shows how the legacy of Jane Addams‘ socialized education can live on in today‘s progressive education, especially in the digital age. Discussion is drawn from a case study of an anti-underage drinking campaign conducted by urban youth of color in an afterschool program. The media ecology environment in the campaign––the integrated usage of new and traditional media––enriched the way the youth made sense of experience and communicated with the world. The campaign led youth to learn more about other important issues, culture, and community history. Another critical element of the campaign‘s success was the active participatory culture of local community organizations and businesses, which formed an extensive support network for the youth‘s engagement. This case suggests that the synergistic relationship between new media ecology and connected learning environments can make progressive education more promising in the digital age.

Keywords: socialized education, connected learning, transformative learning, new media, media ecology,


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Nam, C. (2013). When New Media Meet the Strong Web of Connected Learning Environments: A New Vision of Progressive Education in the Digital Age . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(2), 21-33.

Harvard
Nam, C. (2013). When New Media Meet the Strong Web of Connected Learning Environments: A New Vision of Progressive Education in the Digital Age . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(2), pp. 21-33.

Chicago 16th edition
Nam, Chaebong (2013). "When New Media Meet the Strong Web of Connected Learning Environments: A New Vision of Progressive Education in the Digital Age ". International Journal of Progressive Education 9 (2):21-33.

References
  1. Addams, J. (1900). Labor museum at Hull House. Commons, 47(June), 1-3. [Google Scholar]
  2. Addams, J. (1999). Twenty years at Hull House. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin‘s. (Original work published 1910) [Google Scholar]
  3. Addams, J. (2002). The humanizing tendency of industrial education. In E. C. Lagemann (Ed.), On education; Jane Addams. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers. (Original work published 1904) [Google Scholar]
  4. Addams, J. (2002). Democracy and social ethics. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. (Original work published 1902) [Google Scholar]
  5. Akom, A. A., Cammarota, J., & Ginwright, S. (2008). Youthtopias: Towards a new paradigm of critical youth studies. Youth Media Reporter, 2(4), 1-30. [Google Scholar]
  6. Bruce, B. C., & Lin, C. (2009). Voices of youth: Podcasting as a means for inquiry-based community engagement. E-Learning, 6(2), 230-241. [Google Scholar]
  7. Chavez, V., & Soep, E. (2005). Youth radio and the pedagogy of collegiality Harvard Educational Review, 75(4), 409-435. [Google Scholar]
  8. Daynes, G. & Longo, N. V. (2004). Jane Addams and the origins of service-learning practice in the United States, Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 11(1), 5-13. [Google Scholar]
  9. Duncan-Andrade, J. (2006). Urban youth, media literacy, and increased critical civic participation. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera & J. Cammarota (Eds.), Beyond resistance!: Youth activism and community change (pp. 149-169). New York: Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  10. Goodman, S. (2003). Teaching youth media: A critical guide to literacy, video production, and social change. New York: Teachers College Press. [Google Scholar]
  11. Haddix, M., & Sealey-Ruiz, Y. (2012). Cultivating digital and popular literacies as empowering and emancipatory acts among urban youth. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 56(3), 189-192. [Google Scholar]
  12. Hamilton, C., & Flanagan, C. (2007). Reframing social responsibility within a technology-based youth activist program. American Behavioral Scientist, 51(3), 444-464. [Google Scholar]
  13. Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Weigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robison.A. J. (2009). Confronting      the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century‘, white [Google Scholar]
  14. paper, URL (consulted Nov. 2010). Retrieved from http://digitallearning.macfound.org/atf/cf/%7B7E45C7E0-A3E0-4B89-AC9C- E807E1B0AE4E%7D/JENKINS_WHITE_PAPER.PDF [Google Scholar]
  15. Kahne, J., & Middaugh, E. (2012). Digital media shapes youth participation in politics. Phi Delta Kappan, 94(3), 52-56. [Google Scholar]
  16. Nam, C. (2012,). Implications of community activism among urban minority young people for education for engaged and critical citizenship [Special issue on the Special Issue: Progressive Education: Past, Present and the Future], International Journal of Progressive Education, 8(3), 62-76. [Google Scholar]
  17. Norman, J. M. (2009). Creative activism: Youth media in Palestine. Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, 2, 251-274. [Google Scholar]
  18. Ritzo, C., Nam, C., & Bruce, B. C. (2009). Building a strong web: Connecting information spaces across communities. Library Trends, 57(4), 82-94. [Google Scholar]