International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2013, Vol. 9(2) 98-116

Progressive education in New Zealand: a revered past, a contested present and an uncertain future

Carol Mutch

pp. 98 - 116   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2013.024

Published online: June 15, 2013  |   Number of Views: 5  |  Number of Download: 82


Abstract

In this article, progressive education in New Zealand is examined across three eras. The

‗revered past‘ (1870s-1960s) focuses the influence of progressive ideas on the early childhood movement from the establishment of the first kindergarten in 1889 and on the schooling  sector from the 1930s to the 1960s. The ‗contested present‘ (1970s-2011) examines the attack on progressive education in schools in line with economic downturn from the 1970s onwards and contrasts this with the strengthening of the early childhood movement in the   1990s. The

‗uncertain future‘ (2012- ) looks at how current government policy is continuing to marginalise progressive ideals in favour of market-led educational decision-making but how educators are reclaiming the progressive space with the support of the wider community.

Keywords: Progressive education, education policy, education history


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Mutch, C. (2013). Progressive education in New Zealand: a revered past, a contested present and an uncertain future . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(2), 98-116.

Harvard
Mutch, C. (2013). Progressive education in New Zealand: a revered past, a contested present and an uncertain future . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(2), pp. 98-116.

Chicago 16th edition
Mutch, Carol (2013). "Progressive education in New Zealand: a revered past, a contested present and an uncertain future ". International Journal of Progressive Education 9 (2):98-116.

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