International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2013, Vol. 9(1) 97-108

Co-Creating a Progressive School: The Power of the Group

Fred Burton, Chris Collaros, & Julie Eirich

pp. 97 - 108   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2013.036

Published online: February 15, 2013  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 15


Abstract

Drawing on the past and current practices of a group of educators that just celebrated its 40th year as a progressive elementary school in a suburban public school system, the article begins by considering the role that various groups have played in sustaining the school‘s success for over four decades. These groups include a long-term university partnership, practitioners of whole language, and parents. Then, after describing the critical role of two important group created documents, the Ten Principles of Progressive Education and a triangular graphic depicting the Curriculum of Progressive Education, the authors describe the relationship of how the power of these groups have used the documents to intentionally stay centered as well as move them ―off balance‖ in order to continue to evolve and strengthen their progressive education practices. Finally, the article shares two classroom examples where teachers use  the group and the documents to conduct authentic curriculum classroom studies.

Keywords: progressive elementary schools; collaborative inquiry; integrated curriculum; educational partnerships


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Burton, F., Collaros, C. & Eirich, J. (2013). Co-Creating a Progressive School: The Power of the Group . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(1), 97-108.

Harvard
Burton, F., Collaros, C. and Eirich, J. (2013). Co-Creating a Progressive School: The Power of the Group . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(1), pp. 97-108.

Chicago 16th edition
Burton, Fred, Chris Collaros and Julie Eirich (2013). "Co-Creating a Progressive School: The Power of the Group ". International Journal of Progressive Education 9 (1):97-108.

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