International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2008, Vol. 4(1) 6-23

Narratives on Longing, Being, and Knowing: Envisioning   a Writing Epistemology

Devika Chawla & Amardo Rodriguez

pp. 6 - 23   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2008.010

Published online: February 15, 2008  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 14


Abstract

Abstract: In this paper, I problematize the inextricable relationship between how I constitute knowledge and how I articulate knowledge. Through various narrative reflections I explore my own reckoning with  dominant  ways  of  articulating  knowledge that reinforce ways  of  constituting knowledge  that  are  inherently strange to me. I also outline my sojourns and departures into and from emergent modes of articulating knowledge such as personal narrative and autoethnography.   Even though   I acknowledge the emancipator nature of these modes, I show myself in tension with them in terms of their fit with my own geographies and topographies. I conclude with     a discussion of a larger project I envision which implicates new modes of articulating knowledge that assume a much larger notion of self and personhood. I argue that a  larger notion of self is vital to the making of a  more  expansive  and  inclusive  definition of knowledge

Keywords:


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Chawla, D. & Rodriguez, A. (2008). Narratives on Longing, Being, and Knowing: Envisioning   a Writing Epistemology . International Journal of Progressive Education, 4(1), 6-23.

Harvard
Chawla, D. and Rodriguez, A. (2008). Narratives on Longing, Being, and Knowing: Envisioning   a Writing Epistemology . International Journal of Progressive Education, 4(1), pp. 6-23.

Chicago 16th edition
Chawla, Devika and Amardo Rodriguez (2008). "Narratives on Longing, Being, and Knowing: Envisioning   a Writing Epistemology ". International Journal of Progressive Education 4 (1):6-23.

References
  1. Anzaldua, G. (1987). Borderlands/la frontera: The new mestiza. San Francisco, CA: Aunt Lutes. [Google Scholar]
  2. Anzaldua, G., & Keating, A. (2002). This bridge we call home: Radical visions for transformation. New York:  Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  3. Bhabha, H. K. (1990). The third space. In J. Rutherford (Ed.), Identity, community, culture, difference (pp. 90-118).   London:   Lawrence and Wishart. [Google Scholar]
  4. Bhabha, H. K. (1994). The location of culture. New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul. [Google Scholar]
  5. Bochner, A. P. (2001). Narrative’s Virtues. Qualitative Inquiry, 7, 131-157. Chawla, D. (2003). Two journeys.   Qualitative Inquiry, 9 (5),  785-804. [Google Scholar]
  6. Chawla, D., & Rodriguez, A. (2001).   Emancipatory Pedagogy as  Insurgency. Radical Pedagogy, 3:1. [Google Scholar]
  7. Cisceneros, S. (1984).  The house on mango street.  New York: Vintage.   Conquergood, D. (1991).   Rethinking ethnography: Toward a critical cultural  politics. Communication monographs,  58, 179-194. [Google Scholar]
  8. Conquergood, D. (2002). Performance studies: Interventions and radical   research. The Drama Review:  A Journal of Performance Studies 46 (2),   145-156. [Google Scholar]
  9. Clair, R. P. (2003).  The changing story of ethnography.  In R. P. Clair   (Eds.), Expressions of ethnography.   Albany, NY: SUNY Press. [Google Scholar]
  10. Crawford, L. (1996). Personal Ethnography.   Communication Monographs, 63  (2), [Google Scholar]
  11. 158-170. [Google Scholar]
  12. Frank, A. W. (1995). The wounded storyteller: Body Illness Ethics. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. [Google Scholar]
  13. Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed.  New York:  Continuum.  Geertz, C. (1988).  Works and lives:  The anthropologist as author.   Stanford, CA: Stanford University  Press. [Google Scholar]
  14. Homer, (1996). The Odyssey (Translated by Robert Fagles; first published in 800 B.C. E.). New York: Penguin. [Google Scholar]
  15. hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York: Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  16. Jackson, M. (1989). Paths toward a clearing: Radical empiricism and ethnographic enquiry.   Bloomington, IN:   Indiana University Press. [Google Scholar]
  17. Kondo, D. K. (1990). Crafting selves: Power, gender, and discourses of identity in a Japanese workplace.   Chicago, IL: University of Chicago  Press. [Google Scholar]
  18. Lorde, A. (1984). Sister outsider.   Freedom, CA: Crossing  Press. [Google Scholar]
  19. Madison, D. S. (1999). Performing theory/embodied writing. Text and Performance Quarterly, 19 (2), 107-124. [Google Scholar]
  20. Minh-ha, T. T. (1989). Women, Native, Other: Writing postcoloniality and   Feminism. Bloomington, IN:   Indiana University Press. [Google Scholar]
  21. Moraga, Cherie` (1993). The last generation. Boston, MA: South End Press. Narayan, K. (1993). How native is the ‘native’ anthropologist?   American Anthropologist  95, 671-686. [Google Scholar]
  22. Pollock, D. (1998). Performing writing. In P. Phelan & J. Jane (Eds.), the ends of performance, (pp. 73-103). New York: New York University   Press. [Google Scholar]
  23. Richardson, L. (2000). Writing: A method of inquiry. In N.K. Denzin and Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Research (2nd ed., pp. 923-948). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [Google Scholar]
  24. Richardson, L., & St. Pierre, E. A. (2004). Writing: A method of inquiry. In N. K. Denzin and Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed., pp. 959-978). Thousand Oaks, CA:  Sage. [Google Scholar]
  25. Said, E. W. (1979). Orientalism.  New York:  Vintage. [Google Scholar]
  26. Stacey, J. (1991). Can there be a feminist ethnography? In S. B. Gluck and D. Patai (Eds.), Women’s words: The feminist practice of oral history. London: Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  27. West, C. (1991). The dilemma of the black intellectual. In b. hooks and C. West, Breaking bread: Insurgent black intellectual life. Boston, MA: South End Press. [Google Scholar]
  28. Willis, P. (1977). Learning to labor:  How working class kids get working class   jobs. New York:   Columbia University Press, [Google Scholar]