International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2007, Vol. 3(3) 6-19

When eagles are allowed to fly – a global and contextual perspective on teacher education in Ethiopia

Lars Dahlström

pp. 6 - 19   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2007.002

Published online: October 15, 2007  |   Number of Views: 3  |  Number of Download: 21


Abstract

The present reconfiguration of education by neo-liberal forces worldwide is taken as a basis for this essay. Drawing on examples of how this reconfiguration operates on national arenas through decisive and dishonest discourses of commoditisation and privatisation, management and efficiency, education for all and student-centred education, the essay looks at the Ethiopian case and  how neo-liberalism operates on  that arena and how a counter-hegemonic agenda was implanted through  a  master course for teacher educators following a different and critical practitioner inquiry approach modelling emancipation and social justice within teacher education and  society at large.

Keywords:


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Dahlstrom, L. (2007). When eagles are allowed to fly – a global and contextual perspective on teacher education in Ethiopia . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(3), 6-19.

Harvard
Dahlstrom, L. (2007). When eagles are allowed to fly – a global and contextual perspective on teacher education in Ethiopia . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(3), pp. 6-19.

Chicago 16th edition
Dahlstrom, Lars (2007). "When eagles are allowed to fly – a global and contextual perspective on teacher education in Ethiopia ". International Journal of Progressive Education 3 (3):6-19.

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