International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2006, Vol. 2(3) 78-97

The Possibilities of Transformation: Critical Research and Peter McLaren

Brad J. Porfilio

pp. 78 - 97   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2006.013

Published online: October 01, 2006  |   Number of Views: 114  |  Number of Download: 425


Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to unveil how Peter McLaren’s revolutionary brand of pedagogy, multiculturalism, and research colored my two-year qualitative research study, which unearthed twenty White female future teachers’ experiences and perceptions in relationship to computing technology and male-centered computing culture. His ideas positioned me to see beyond technocentric discourses generated by political, economic, and education leaders, as I was enabled to pinpoint how larger social relations of power perpetuate computing technology as a “boy’s toy,” designed to amass wealth and power for elite White male corporate leaders at the expense of the vast majority of global citizens. His scholarship also proved to be a source courage and inspiration. It prodded me to believe my research project has the potency to bludgeon unjust practices that perpetuate women's and girls' technological reticence, fuel the corporate takeover of teacher education, and perpetuate Western imperialism, environmental degradation, and hopelessness across the globe. Not coincidently, the critical study served as an educative space for several pre-service teachers. They uncovered how several constitutive forces merge with unjust practices to create women’s and girls’ computing reticence as well as perpetuate women’s marginalization in schools, the business world, and in other social contexts. They appear to possess the critical mindset and courage to create classroom practices bent on forging an egalitarian society.

Keywords: -


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Porfilio, B.J. (2006). The Possibilities of Transformation: Critical Research and Peter McLaren. International Journal of Progressive Education, 2(3), 78-97.

Harvard
Porfilio, B. (2006). The Possibilities of Transformation: Critical Research and Peter McLaren. International Journal of Progressive Education, 2(3), pp. 78-97.

Chicago 16th edition
Porfilio, Brad J. (2006). "The Possibilities of Transformation: Critical Research and Peter McLaren". International Journal of Progressive Education 2 (3):78-97.

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