International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2014, Vol. 10(2) 32-36

The Pedagogy of Leadership and Educating a Global Workforce

Dannielle Joy Davis

pp. 32 - 36   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2014.048

Published online: June 15, 2014  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 26


Abstract

No Child Left Behind illustrates policy that stifles pedagogy and the effective training of a global workforce. In an effort to enhance the educational outcomes of students, critical pedagogy and Gardner’s Five Minds for the Future are presented as tools for the cultivation of a more innovative workforce. The pedagogical strategies and framework presented hold the potential of improving the academic output and global competitiveness of postsecondary graduates.

Keywords: Critical pedagogy, Gardner’s Five Minds for the Future, global workforce


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Davis, D.J. (2014). The Pedagogy of Leadership and Educating a Global Workforce . International Journal of Progressive Education, 10(2), 32-36.

Harvard
Davis, D. (2014). The Pedagogy of Leadership and Educating a Global Workforce . International Journal of Progressive Education, 10(2), pp. 32-36.

Chicago 16th edition
Davis, Dannielle Joy (2014). "The Pedagogy of Leadership and Educating a Global Workforce ". International Journal of Progressive Education 10 (2):32-36.

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