International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2014, Vol. 10(2) 73-88

The Impact of Discourse Signaling Devices on the Listening Comprehension of L2 Learners

Fahimeh Tajabadi, & Mahboubeh Taghizadeh

pp. 73 - 88   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2014.052

Published online: June 15, 2014  |   Number of Views: 2  |  Number of Download: 21


Abstract

The purpose of this study was two-fold: first, it aimed at examining the impact of expository text  topics on the listening comprehension of L2 learners; second, it aimed to investigate the impact of macro, micro, and macro-micro discourse markers on the listening comprehension of expository texts by L2 learners. The participants (N =105) were male and female adult L2 learners at upper- intermediate level selected from a number of English language institutes in Iran. The materials consisted of three expository texts and three versions (i.e., micro, macro, and macro-micro) for each text, which were developed by the researchers based on Chaudron and Richard’s (1986) model of discourse markers. A listening proficiency test and three sets of listening comprehension tests were the instruments of this study. The analysis of the data revealed that there was no significant difference in the participants’ performance on the three expository texts. The results also showed that macromicro versions received the highest mean, while macro versions received the lowest mean. The findings of this study suggested that the combination versions of micro and macro discourse markers contributed more to the comprehension of L2 listeners than only micro and macro versions did.

Keywords: discourse markers, expository texts, listening comprehension, macromarkers, micromarkers


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Tajabadi, F. & Taghizadeh, M. (2014). The Impact of Discourse Signaling Devices on the Listening Comprehension of L2 Learners . International Journal of Progressive Education, 10(2), 73-88.

Harvard
Tajabadi, F. and Taghizadeh, M. (2014). The Impact of Discourse Signaling Devices on the Listening Comprehension of L2 Learners . International Journal of Progressive Education, 10(2), pp. 73-88.

Chicago 16th edition
Tajabadi, Fahimeh and Mahboubeh Taghizadeh (2014). "The Impact of Discourse Signaling Devices on the Listening Comprehension of L2 Learners ". International Journal of Progressive Education 10 (2):73-88.

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