International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2007, Vol. 3(2) 8-29

Looking Back to Look Forward: Understanding the Present By Revisiting The Past: An Australian Perspective

Brian Cambourne* & Jan Turbill

pp. 8 - 29   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2007.007

Published online: October 15, 2007  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 15


Abstract

Cambourne and Turbill trace the growth, change and finally marginalisation of progressive approaches to literacy education by examining whole language  philosophy in Australia from the 1960s to the present. Using a critical lens, Cambourne and Turbill describe how whole language has been positioned throughout the last nearly 50 years in terms of curriculum, pedagogy, and  assessment. Cambourne and Turbill offer a personal history of whole language in Australia and draw connections of the educational changes occurring in their country to other western democracies. Their insights are valuable in order to examine other  grass  roots programs and to better understand how politics impact educational movements.

Keywords:


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Cambourne*, B. & Turbill, J. (2007). Looking Back to Look Forward: Understanding the Present By Revisiting The Past: An Australian Perspective . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(2), 8-29.

Harvard
Cambourne*, B. and Turbill, J. (2007). Looking Back to Look Forward: Understanding the Present By Revisiting The Past: An Australian Perspective . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(2), pp. 8-29.

Chicago 16th edition
Cambourne*, Brian and Jan Turbill (2007). "Looking Back to Look Forward: Understanding the Present By Revisiting The Past: An Australian Perspective ". International Journal of Progressive Education 3 (2):8-29.

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