International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2007, Vol. 3(2) 68-82

Becoming Whole Language Teachers and Social Justice Agents: Pre-service Teachers Inquire with Sixth Graders

Monica Taylor, & Gennifer Otinsky

pp. 68 - 82   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2007.010

Published online: June 15, 2007  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 18


Abstract

As we strive to help pre-service teachers understand both why and how to teach for social justice, we face the challenge of making whole language teaching less abstract and intangible. Frequently pre-service teachers understand the principles of teaching for social justice but have no sense of how to infuse them into their teaching. They accept that these theories can be utilized in their education courses but they are doubtful that they would work successfully with children or even be accepted in K-12 school environments.

Keywords:


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Taylor, M. & Otinsky, G. (2007). Becoming Whole Language Teachers and Social Justice Agents: Pre-service Teachers Inquire with Sixth Graders . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(2), 68-82.

Harvard
Taylor, M. and Otinsky, G. (2007). Becoming Whole Language Teachers and Social Justice Agents: Pre-service Teachers Inquire with Sixth Graders . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(2), pp. 68-82.

Chicago 16th edition
Taylor, Monica and Gennifer Otinsky (2007). "Becoming Whole Language Teachers and Social Justice Agents: Pre-service Teachers Inquire with Sixth Graders ". International Journal of Progressive Education 3 (2):68-82.

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