International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2022, Vol. 18(5) 193-208

American Families’ Attitudes to Unschooling: A National Survey

Wi̇lli̇am Vesneski̇, Alan Breen, Ulcca Hansen, Fredrika Reisman & Holly Anselm

pp. 193 - 208   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2022.467.12   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2206-16-0004

Published online: October 01, 2022  |   Number of Views: 62  |  Number of Download: 86


Abstract

A national survey of American families was conducted to ascertain the extent of interest in self-directed education (SDE) in the United States. Our research took place in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic - a moment when we need a much better understanding of what parents need from the US education system. Data were gathered using an online survey aimed at parents or caregivers of young people aged 4-18. A total of 1009 adults completed the caregiver survey. Resulting data were analyzed using SPSS. Results suggest a high degree of openness to SDE. The data also elucidate several questions and concerns that parents and caregivers have about the approach. Data also highlighted differing perceptions of and attitudes towards SDE as a function of race. As the first nationwide survey about SDE, this study has made an important contribution to the existing literature on the subject. Directions for further research are discussed

Keywords: Self-Directed Education, SDE, Unschooling, Education Alternatives, Homeschooling, Student-Centered Education


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Vesneski̇, W., Breen, A., Hansen, U., Reisman, F. & Anselm, H. (2022). American Families’ Attitudes to Unschooling: A National Survey . International Journal of Progressive Education, 18(5), 193-208. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2022.467.12

Harvard
Vesneski̇, W., Breen, A., Hansen, U., Reisman, F. and Anselm, H. (2022). American Families’ Attitudes to Unschooling: A National Survey . International Journal of Progressive Education, 18(5), pp. 193-208.

Chicago 16th edition
Vesneski̇, Wi̇lli̇am, Alan Breen, Ulcca Hansen, Fredrika Reisman and Holly Anselm (2022). "American Families’ Attitudes to Unschooling: A National Survey ". International Journal of Progressive Education 18 (5):193-208. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2022.467.12.

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