International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2005, Vol. 1(2) 31-48

Improving Attendance and Punctuality Of FE Basic Skill Students Through an Innovative Scheme

Gordon O. Ade-Ojo

pp. 31 - 48   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2005.007

Published online: June 01, 2005  |   Number of Views: 329  |  Number of Download: 381


Abstract

This paper reports the findings of a study set up to establish the impact of a particular scheme on the attendance and punctuality performance of a group of Basic Skills learners against the backdrop of various theoretical postulations on managing undesirable behavior.

Data collected on learners' performance was subjected to statistical analysis through the use of the SPSS analytical toolkit in order to establish the T-value, probability value and significance, as well as the confidence level of intervals. Findings from statistical analysis were then subjected to a process of corroboration through a focus group discussion with subjects in the study.

Based on the findings, the study concludes that the scheme has a significant impact on some aspects of the learners' performance and advocates the introduction of novel ways, in the context of mixed approaches towards eradicating undesirable behaviors among young learners.

 

Keywords: -


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Ade-Ojo, G.O. (2005). Improving Attendance and Punctuality Of FE Basic Skill Students Through an Innovative Scheme. International Journal of Progressive Education, 1(2), 31-48.

Harvard
Ade-Ojo, G. (2005). Improving Attendance and Punctuality Of FE Basic Skill Students Through an Innovative Scheme. International Journal of Progressive Education, 1(2), pp. 31-48.

Chicago 16th edition
Ade-Ojo, Gordon O. (2005). "Improving Attendance and Punctuality Of FE Basic Skill Students Through an Innovative Scheme". International Journal of Progressive Education 1 (2):31-48.

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