International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2005, Vol. 1(2) 49-58

Rethinking Progressivism and the Crisis of Liberal Humanism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Education for Democratic Citizenship

Emery J. Hyslop-Margison & Theresa Richardson

pp. 49 - 58   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2005.008

Published online: June 01, 2005  |   Number of Views: 167  |  Number of Download: 435


Abstract

In this paper, we examine the current siege on progressivism in light of these dual tendencies from both an historical and contemporary perspective. We defend the democratic objectives of progressive education from various contemporary attacks that view student-centered learning as academically inefficacious. With the assistance of Dewey's arguments, w e argue that public schools should produce students prepared to assume their democratic citizenship responsibilities by pursuing the liberal humanistic strand of progressive education. We believe that progressive education approaches that emphasize student centered learning and conjoint decision-making afford an indispensable element to achieve that critically important objective.

Keywords: -


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Hyslop-Margison, E.J. & Richardson, T. (2005). Rethinking Progressivism and the Crisis of Liberal Humanism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Education for Democratic Citizenship. International Journal of Progressive Education, 1(2), 49-58.

Harvard
Hyslop-Margison, E. and Richardson, T. (2005). Rethinking Progressivism and the Crisis of Liberal Humanism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Education for Democratic Citizenship. International Journal of Progressive Education, 1(2), pp. 49-58.

Chicago 16th edition
Hyslop-Margison, Emery J. and Theresa Richardson (2005). "Rethinking Progressivism and the Crisis of Liberal Humanism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Education for Democratic Citizenship". International Journal of Progressive Education 1 (2):49-58.

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