International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2005, Vol. 1(3) 58-78

The Dimensions of Reflection: A Conceptual and Contextual Analysis

Susan E. Noffke & Marie Brennan

pp. 58 - 78   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2005.012

Published online: October 01, 2005  |   Number of Views: 221  |  Number of Download: 386


Abstract

In the article, authors identify some of the problems in the present notions of reflective teaching. The authors argue that none of these conceptions deal with reflection itself in a reflexive way. They tend to use theories of reflection as a canopy for their own "middle level" theorizing about reflective teaching. First, the authors consider the development of the term and some of its popularization in teacher education. Some problems the authors identify are located in the history of the concept "reflection" and its philosophical underpinnings. Others emerge from particular applications within teacher education itself. Their critique challenges the prevalent conceptions of reflection and proceeds to offer new direction for further reconstruction of the theory and practice of reflective teaching. The final section offers an alternative conceptualization of “reflection” designed to address many of the concerns the authors raise, while acknowledging that some will always need to be addressed as a continual process.

Keywords: -


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Noffke, S.E. & Brennan, M. (2005). The Dimensions of Reflection: A Conceptual and Contextual Analysis. International Journal of Progressive Education, 1(3), 58-78.

Harvard
Noffke, S. and Brennan, M. (2005). The Dimensions of Reflection: A Conceptual and Contextual Analysis. International Journal of Progressive Education, 1(3), pp. 58-78.

Chicago 16th edition
Noffke, Susan E. and Marie Brennan (2005). "The Dimensions of Reflection: A Conceptual and Contextual Analysis". International Journal of Progressive Education 1 (3):58-78.

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