International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2014, Vol. 10(1) 6-17

Occupy Activists, Moved or Not by Secondary Teachers

Mark Abendroth

pp. 6 - 17   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2014.055

Published online: February 15, 2014  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 21


Abstract

This article explores whether and how activists who identify with the Occupy movement  think of their secondary schooling as influential upon their activism. Testimonies of six activists from two small focus groups reveal a range from those who claimed no such influence to those who saw a significant connection. The diversity among  the six was  limited: five were male; two identified themselves as mixed-race, and the other four as white; three were younger than twenty-seven. Each individual’s account of various influences other than education was unique.  When the topic turned to secondary education, though, there  were intensified expressions from sadness to anger to irony to delight among the participants. As the findings of this study show, formal education has hindrances and possibilities in fostering change agency for social justice. Increasing the possibilities is the work of critical educators.

Keywords: Occupy movement, Secondary schooling, Testimonies, Critical educators


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Abendroth, M. (2014). Occupy Activists, Moved or Not by Secondary Teachers . International Journal of Progressive Education, 10(1), 6-17.

Harvard
Abendroth, M. (2014). Occupy Activists, Moved or Not by Secondary Teachers . International Journal of Progressive Education, 10(1), pp. 6-17.

Chicago 16th edition
Abendroth, Mark (2014). "Occupy Activists, Moved or Not by Secondary Teachers ". International Journal of Progressive Education 10 (1):6-17.

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