International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2013, Vol. 9(3) 169-177

The Impact of Exclusionary Discipline on Students

Thomas G. Ryan, & Brian Goodram

pp. 169 - 177   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2013.012

Published online: October 15, 2013  |   Number of Views: 10  |  Number of Download: 24


Abstract

The impact of exclusionary discipline on students is clear and negative as we report herein. The impacts of exclusionary discipline have been negatively linked to the academic and  social development of disciplined students. We argue that this discipline form has been disproportionately used among certain groups, particularly those students of certain minority and / or ethnic groups, students from lower socio-economic backgrounds, and those students with identified exceptionalities. Exclusionary and zero-tolerance approaches to school discipline are not the best techniques to create a safe climate in contemporary education settings.

Keywords: suspensions, exclusion, suspensions, zero-tolerance, discipline


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Ryan, T.G., Ryan, & Goodram, B. (2013). The Impact of Exclusionary Discipline on Students . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(3), 169-177.

Harvard
Ryan, T., Ryan, and Goodram, B. (2013). The Impact of Exclusionary Discipline on Students . International Journal of Progressive Education, 9(3), pp. 169-177.

Chicago 16th edition
Ryan, Thomas G., Ryan and Brian Goodram (2013). "The Impact of Exclusionary Discipline on Students ". International Journal of Progressive Education 9 (3):169-177.

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