International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2012, Vol. 8(1) 6-21

Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt’s Public   Schools

John Isaac

pp. 6 - 21   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2012.059

Published online: February 15, 2012  |   Number of Views: 1  |  Number of Download: 14


Abstract

The Arab Spring exposed the hidden secrets of Egyptian society to the global community. In spite of the insatiable media attention paid to the Mubarak regime and the toll it took on the entire country, Egypt’s education  system  received  little  attention. For decades, Egypt’s public schools have forced  students  to  attend segregated classes, based on an individual’s religious and ethnic background. Egypt’s Coptic community constitutes approximately 10 percent of  the  population  yet  members of this community must designate their religious affiliation and, as a result, students adhering to the Christian faith are given a separate religious education. Also, students identifying as Muslim must attend a course on  Islam.  This  dichotomous system instills a sense of other in students at a young age, thereby promoting tension between the two communities.   Phronetic research methods will be utilized in this   study to chart a new direction for Egypt’s public education   system.

Keywords: Religious Education, Arab Spring, Egypt’s education system


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Isaac, J. (2012). Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt’s Public   Schools . International Journal of Progressive Education, 8(1), 6-21.

Harvard
Isaac, J. (2012). Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt’s Public   Schools . International Journal of Progressive Education, 8(1), pp. 6-21.

Chicago 16th edition
Isaac, John (2012). "Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt’s Public   Schools ". International Journal of Progressive Education 8 (1):6-21.