International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2007, Vol. 3(1) 44-64

Cross-Cultural Perspectives of International Doctoral Students: Two-Way Learning in Library and Information Science Education

Bharat Mehra, & Ann P. Bishop

pp. 44 - 64   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2007.015

Published online: February 15, 2007  |   Number of Views: 2  |  Number of Download: 26


Abstract

This paper draws upon a case study of library and information science (LIS) international doctoral students in the United States and documents their perspectives to identify ways to further internationalization. Internationalization is defined as incorporating non-US issues and elements into LIS education. The study explores internationalization in the context of a “two-way” learning process in which international students gain from the discipline, but also LIS education gains from the  cross- cultural experiences of the students. Documenting the perspectives of LIS international doctoral students provides a critical outlook by giving voice to an under-represented group. It also becomes a methodological    strategy    to    represent    global    diversity    and    facilitate     cross-cultural exchange.

Keywords: internationalization, cross-cultural perspectives, international doctoral students, two-way learning


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Mehra, B. & Bishop, A.P. (2007). Cross-Cultural Perspectives of International Doctoral Students: Two-Way Learning in Library and Information Science Education . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(1), 44-64.

Harvard
Mehra, B. and Bishop, A. (2007). Cross-Cultural Perspectives of International Doctoral Students: Two-Way Learning in Library and Information Science Education . International Journal of Progressive Education, 3(1), pp. 44-64.

Chicago 16th edition
Mehra, Bharat and Ann P. Bishop (2007). "Cross-Cultural Perspectives of International Doctoral Students: Two-Way Learning in Library and Information Science Education ". International Journal of Progressive Education 3 (1):44-64.

References
  1. Association of Library and Information Science (ed.), Library and Information Science Education Statistical Report 2003 (Section II). Washington DC: Association of Library and Information Science Educators. Retrieved August 15, 2004, from http://ils.unc.edu/ALISE/2003/Students/Students01.htm. [Google Scholar]
  2. Bender, D. L. (1996). 21st Century Earth: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. Broidy, E. (1999). Celebrating Diversity, Ten Years Later. Reference Services Review, 27(3), 266-271. Carmines, E. & Zeller, R. (1979). Reliability and Validity Assessment. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage. [Google Scholar]
  3. Carnovsky, L. (1971). The Foreign Student in the American Library School. Final Report. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Graduate Library School. [Google Scholar]
  4. Cveljo, K. (1996). Internationalizing LIS Degree Programs: Internationalizing Library and Information Science Degree Programs—Benefits and Challenges for Special Librarians. Paper presentation at the Mid-Missouri Chapter SLA Meeting, Columbia, MO, April 25, 1996. Retrieved August 15, 2004, from http://www.sla.org/content/SLA/professional/businesscase/octeng/cveljo.cfm?style=text. [Google Scholar]
  5. Endres, B. (1996). Habermas and Critical Thinking. Philosophy of Education. Retrieved August 15, 2004, from http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/EPS/PES-Yearbook/96_docs/endres.html. [Google Scholar]
  6. Froomkin, M. A. (2003). Habermas@Discourse.Net: Toward a Critical Theory of Cyberspace. Harvard Law Review, 116(3), 751-873. [Google Scholar]
  7. Glaser, B. G., & Strauss, A. L. (1967). The Discovery of Grounded Theory: Strategies for Qualitative Research. Chicago, IL: Aldine. [Google Scholar]
  8. Habermas, J. (1993). Justification and Application: Remarks on Discourse Ethics. Translated by Ciaran Cronin. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. [Google Scholar]
  9. Haddock, J. (1990). A Comparative Analysis of National Information Policy in Six Industrialized Nations. In J. I. Tallman & J. B. Ojiambo (eds.), Translating an International Education to a National Environment (pp. 45-56). Pittsburgh, PA: School of Library and Information Science. [Google Scholar]
  10. Haig, B. (1995). Grounded Theory as Scientific Method. Philosophy of Education. Retrieved August 15, 2004, from http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/EPS/PES-yearbook/95_docs/haig.html. [Google Scholar]
  11. Josey, E. J. (1990). Meeting the Challenge: Educating for Universal Library and Information Service. In [Google Scholar]
  12. J. I. Tallman & J. B. Ojiambo (eds.), Translating an International Education to a National Environment (pp. 1-12). Pittsburgh, PA: School of Library and Information Science. [Google Scholar]
  13. Kellner, K. (1989). Critical Theory, Marxism, and Modernity: Development and Contemporary Relevance of the Frankfurt School. Cambridge, MA: Polity Press. [Google Scholar]
  14. Layder, D. (1990). The Realist Image in Social Science. New York: St. Martin's Press. [Google Scholar]
  15. Marques de Oliveira, S. (1990). The Compatibility between American Library and Information Science Programs and Foreign Countries’ Needs: An Exploratory Study. In J. L. Tallman & J. B. Ojiambo (eds.), Translating an International Education to a National Environment (pp. 83-104). Pittsburgh, PA: School of Library and Information Science. [Google Scholar]
  16. McLuhan, M. (1964). Understanding Media. New York: Mentor. [Google Scholar]
  17. Mehra, B. (2005). A Phase-Model of the Cross-Cultural Learning Process of LIS International Doctoral Students: Characteristics and Interventions. Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science & Technology 2005 Annual Meeting: Sparking Synergies: Bringing Research and Practice Together @ ASIST '05. [Google Scholar]
  18. Ojiambo, J. B. (1990). Transfer of Western Management Expertise to Developing Countries. In J. I. Tallman & J. B. Ojiambo (eds.), Translating an International Education to a National Environment (pp. 65-82). Pittsburgh, PA: School of Library and Information Science. [Google Scholar]
  19. Robbins, J. C. (1978). Celebrating Diversity: A Report on and Plea for Multicultural Graduate Library Education. Paper presentation at the Annual Conference of the Association of American Library Schools, Chicago IL, January 21-23, 1978. [Google Scholar]
  20. Rochester, M. K. (1986). Foreign Students in American Library Education: Impact on Home Countries. New York: Greenwood Press. [Google Scholar]
  21. Sarkodie-Mensah, K. (1988). Foreign Students and U.S. Academic Libraries: A Case Study of Foreign Students and Libraries in Two Universities in New Orleans, Louisiana. Ph. D. dissertation. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [Google Scholar]
  22. Saye, J. D., & Wisser, K. M. (2003). Students. In Association of Library and Information Science (ed.), Library and Information Science Education Statistical Report 2003 (Section II). Washington DC: Association of Library and Information Science Educators. Retrieved August 15, 2004, from http://ils.unc.edu/ALISE/2003/Students/Students01.htm. [Google Scholar]
  23. Schwandt, T.A. (1994). Constuctivist, Interpretivist Approaches in Qualitative Research. In N. Denzin & Y. Lincoln (eds.), The Handbook of Qualitative Research (pp. 118-137). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. [Google Scholar]
  24. Strauss, A. & Corbin, J. (1994). Grounded Theory Methodology. In N. Denzin & Y. Lincoln (eds.), The Handbook of Qualitative Research (pp. 273-285). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. [Google Scholar]
  25. Tallman, J. I. (1990). International Students in United States Library and Information Science Schools. In J. I. Tallman & J. B. Ojiambo (eds.), Translating an International Education to a National Environment (pp. 13-22). Pittsburgh, PA: School of Library and Information Science. [Google Scholar]
  26. Zhang, F. I. (1990). Library Network Development in China? Should it be Different from the U.S.? In J. [Google Scholar]
  27. Tallman & J. B. Ojiambo (eds.), Translating an International Education to a National Environment. (pp. ). Pittsburgh, PA: School of Library and Information Science. [Google Scholar]