International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2021, Vol. 17(6) 93-114

English as an International Language Teaching and Perceptions: A Case Study of Thai Tertiary English Language Teachers

Kewalin Jantadej

pp. 93 - 114   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2021.382.7   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2103-05-0001

Published online: December 03, 2021  |   Number of Views: 32  |  Number of Download: 122


Abstract

This study scrutinized English as an international language teaching (EILT) and perceptions of Thai tertiary English language teachers through a 20-item Likert Scale questionnaire and a 7-question semi-structured interview protocol. The results from these two instruments disclosed some inconsistencies. Although the questionnaire results revealed that the participants (n=15) perceived the role of EILT to a great level, the semi-structured interview results indicated that they did not entirely implement EILT in their classroom. It was manifest that participants were confused with the concept and principles of EILT as they considered it a new language teaching paradigm. Therefore, they were uncertain how to implement EILT into practice. Some were misunderstood and misled to provide linguistic and cultural literacy to their students. Besides, they disregarded to raise awareness on the dispossession of English and underline the proud localism concept to their students. However, it was noteworthy that participants best applied English as an international language interpretation in their classroom. Overall results evidenced that a case study of the English teaching situation found from this study remained far from the progress of moving toward EILT and suggested that the EILT paradigm should be urgently and sustainably endorsed and integrated into the English teaching curriculum in Thailand.

Keywords: English as an International Language Teaching (EILT), English as a Foreign Language (EFL), English as a Global language (EGL), World Englishes (WE)


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Jantadej, K. (2021). English as an International Language Teaching and Perceptions: A Case Study of Thai Tertiary English Language Teachers . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(6), 93-114. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2021.382.7

Harvard
Jantadej, K. (2021). English as an International Language Teaching and Perceptions: A Case Study of Thai Tertiary English Language Teachers . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(6), pp. 93-114.

Chicago 16th edition
Jantadej, Kewalin (2021). "English as an International Language Teaching and Perceptions: A Case Study of Thai Tertiary English Language Teachers ". International Journal of Progressive Education 17 (6):93-114. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2021.382.7.

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