International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 2834-7919   |  e-ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2024, Vol. 20(2) 57-64

The Artful Life as Transactional Process: How John Dewey Connects Art, Democracy, and Everyday Experience 

Martina Riedler Eryaman

pp. 57 - 64   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2024.657.4   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2404-24-0001

Published online: April 24, 2024  |   Number of Views: 19  |  Number of Download: 117


Abstract

This article explores John Dewey’s influential perspective on art, which challenges traditional views that confine art to museums and galleries. Drawing on Dewey’s seminal work, “Art as Experience,” the article demonstrates that art is not merely about objects, but rather the quality of experience we have with the world around us. This experience is an ongoing transactional process between ourselves and our environment. Artworks serve as powerful tools within this process, shaping how we engage with everything from everyday tasks to artistic masterpieces. Through art, we can refine our experiences, gain new perspectives, and even undergo personal transformation. Furthermore, the article delves into the connection between Dewey’s concept of art and his broader philosophical ideals, particularly his democratic vision. Art, according to John Dewey, plays a crucial role in a healthy democracy. Artworks can foster a sense of community by providing shared experiences and sparking communication about important social issues. The article further discusses how art can challenge the status quo and inspire citizens to become active participants in shaping their society. Finally, the article explores Dewey’s notion of the “Everyday as Artful,” where artistic principles can be applied to even the most mundane tasks, enriching our daily lives and contributing to a more aesthetically pleasing society. To illustrate these concepts, the article references various art examples throughout the discussion.

Keywords: Artful Life, Transactional Process, John Dewey, Art, Democracy, Everyday Experience


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Eryaman, M.R. (2024). The Artful Life as Transactional Process: How John Dewey Connects Art, Democracy, and Everyday Experience  . International Journal of Progressive Education, 20(2), 57-64. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2024.657.4

Harvard
Eryaman, M. (2024). The Artful Life as Transactional Process: How John Dewey Connects Art, Democracy, and Everyday Experience  . International Journal of Progressive Education, 20(2), pp. 57-64.

Chicago 16th edition
Eryaman, Martina Riedler (2024). "The Artful Life as Transactional Process: How John Dewey Connects Art, Democracy, and Everyday Experience  ". International Journal of Progressive Education 20 (2):57-64. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2024.657.4.

References
  1. Abbing, H. (2003). John Dewey’s aesthetics: Experience without fixed foundations. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 37(4), 7-22. [Google Scholar]
  2. Cavadini, C. (1997). Dewey on aesthetics: Experience and the world. The Journal of Philosophy, 94(2), 66-84. [Google Scholar]
  3. Clark, J. (2001). Dewey, aesthetics, and the pragmatist turn. State University of New York Press. [Google Scholar]
  4. DeLong, M. (2019). Dewey’s theory of experience and its implications for art education. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 38(2), 141-153. [Google Scholar]
  5. Dewey, J. (1934). Art as Experience. Perigee Books. [Google Scholar]
  6. Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. Kappa Delta Pi. [Google Scholar]
  7. Dooley, A. (2009). John Dewey on education and aesthetics. Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  8. Duncum, P. (2000). Art and social theory. Blackwell Publishing. [Google Scholar]
  9. Egan, K. (1990). John Dewey and the lessons of art. Teachers College Press. [Google Scholar]
  10. Evans, R. (1980). Art, experience, and education: A Deweyan approach. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 9(1), 7-22. [Google Scholar]
  11. Garrison, J. (1987). John Dewey and the aesthetics of transformation. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 21(1), 75-88. [Google Scholar]
  12. Goldblatt, P. (2012). How John Dewey’s Theories Underpin Art and Art Education. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 44(2), 229-249. [Google Scholar]
  13. Hausman, C. R. (1989). Metaphilosophy of aesthetics. Blackwell. [Google Scholar]
  14. Hickman, L. T. (1990). John Dewey and aesthetics: Experience as the medium of creation. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 24(2), 5-22. [Google Scholar]
  15. Hoopla, K. (2000). Dewey’s aesthetics and the question of value. Educational Theory, 50(4), 417-434. [Google Scholar]
  16. Jacob, M. J. (2018). Dewey for artists. University of Chicago Press. [Google Scholar]
  17. Lederman, L. (1987). John Dewey and the experience of art. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 21(1), 5-24. [Google Scholar]
  18. McCluskey, W. A. (2004). John Dewey, art and public life. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 38(3), 26-42. [Google Scholar]
  19. Novak, M. (1995). Presences and absences: Writing in the culture of education. State University of New York Press. [Google Scholar]
  20. Novitz, D. (2004). Understanding aesthetics: John Dewey’s pragmatism and public Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education, 38(3), 5-25. [Google Scholar]
  21. Ryan, A. (2006). John Dewey and democracy. Educational theory, 56(3), 323-342. [Google Scholar]
  22. Schiralli, V. (2007). Art as experience and the critique of formalism in John Dewey’s aesthetics. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 39(5), 603-620. [Google Scholar]
  23. Shusterman, R. (2000). Pragmatist aesthetics: Living beauty, rethinking art. Blackwell Publishing. [Google Scholar]
  24. Walford, C. (1998). Dewey on aesthetics: The place of art in human experience. Educational Theory, 48(3), 321-340. [Google Scholar]