International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2021, Vol. 17(5) 87-101

Perceptions and Beliefs of the Teachers of Kindergarten and the First Primary Stage for Employing Digital Technologies in the Education Process in Jordan

Nahil Aljaberi

pp. 87 - 101   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2021.375.7   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2103-05-0005.R1

Published online: September 30, 2021  |   Number of Views: 4  |  Number of Download: 24


Abstract

This study aims to explore the reality of employing digital technologies in the education of kindergarten children and the primary stage. It also aims to determine the views and perceptions of children towards these technologies and how to deal with them. The study also aims to determine the perceptions of kindergarten teachers and the primary stage towards employing digital technologies in children's education. This study included two approaches: the qualitative to reveal the reality and perceptions of employing digital technologies through conducting interviews and recording observations, and the second one quantitative by preparing a scale to measure teachers' perceptions towards employing digital technologies in children's education (PBDT), which consists of (62) paragraphs measuring (6) Various aspects. The sample consists of (64) children from kindergarten and primary stage, from both the government and private sectors. As for the sample of teachers, it reached (99) teachers from kindergarten and primary stage teachers from both the government and private sectors. The study concluds that the majority of children use digital technologies, and this use is done under the supervision of parents; (YouTube) is the most used application,  electronic games are the most topics that employ digital technologies, then religious studies and music. The study also shows that children prefer traditional games, story-telling from a mother or teacher, and studying through books instead of using digital technologies. The study also shows that teachers' perceptions of employing digital technologies are moderate. Besides, the number of years of experience, the teaching stage, and the level of knowledge of digital technologies are all factors that do not affect teachers' perceptions towards employing digital technologies.

Keywords: Perceptions, Teacher Beliefs, Kindergarten, Primary Stage, Digital Technologies


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Aljaberi, N. (2021). Perceptions and Beliefs of the Teachers of Kindergarten and the First Primary Stage for Employing Digital Technologies in the Education Process in Jordan . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(5), 87-101. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2021.375.7

Harvard
Aljaberi, N. (2021). Perceptions and Beliefs of the Teachers of Kindergarten and the First Primary Stage for Employing Digital Technologies in the Education Process in Jordan . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(5), pp. 87-101.

Chicago 16th edition
Aljaberi, Nahil (2021). "Perceptions and Beliefs of the Teachers of Kindergarten and the First Primary Stage for Employing Digital Technologies in the Education Process in Jordan ". International Journal of Progressive Education 17 (5):87-101. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2021.375.7.

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