International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2021, Vol. 17(3) 397-409

Student Perceptions of the Implications of a Financial Literacy Project Within a College Mathematics Course

Michelle Meadows & Sami Mejri

pp. 397 - 409   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2021.346.25   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2101-07-0004.R1

Published online: June 07, 2021  |   Number of Views: 13  |  Number of Download: 90


Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their engagement in an experiential learning project with a focus on financial literacy within general education mathematics courses (skills, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors). Specifically, the researchers were looking to investigate whether the completion of a finance project within a general education mathematics course influences students' perception of and knowledge about personal finance concerning their lives and career paths. An aggregated analysis of survey responses using Qualtrics showed approximately half of students lacked knowledge of personal finance, the skills to interpret financial information, and expressed limited knowledge of loan repayment calculations. While over half of the participants would recommend this course to other students. There was no statistical significance in the correlation between students' assessments of their pre-and-post financial literacy knowledge and whether they recommend this course for future students. However, the majority of responders indicated that they have thought about future career and personal finance before completing the project.

Keywords: Student Loan Debt, Financial Literacy, Personal Finance, Experiential Learning, Finance Project


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Meadows, M. & Mejri, S. (2021). Student Perceptions of the Implications of a Financial Literacy Project Within a College Mathematics Course . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(3), 397-409. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2021.346.25

Harvard
Meadows, M. and Mejri, S. (2021). Student Perceptions of the Implications of a Financial Literacy Project Within a College Mathematics Course . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(3), pp. 397-409.

Chicago 16th edition
Meadows, Michelle and Sami Mejri (2021). "Student Perceptions of the Implications of a Financial Literacy Project Within a College Mathematics Course ". International Journal of Progressive Education 17 (3):397-409. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2021.346.25.

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