International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2010, Vol. 6(3) 51-64

Identifying students’ learning style preferences regarding some variables in the EFL classroom: The case of  Turkey

Cevdet Yılmaz, & Salih Zeki Genç

pp. 51 - 64   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2010.005

Published online: October 15, 2010  |   Number of Views: 0  |  Number of Download: 23


Abstract

During the past decade, the identification of students’ learning style preferences has gained importance in educational research. This study aimed at identifying the individual perceptions of the learner style preferences of Turkish EFL learners. Using learning style preference categories and a 28-item language learning preference questionnaire adopted from Willing, the authors focussed on a group of 60 students at the ELT Department, Onsekiz Mart University. As a further step, the emphasis was   also placed on the variables such as sex, attendance to prep class and  schools  graduated. In doing so, the study sought to find out  whether  these  variables  were likely to have an impact on students’ learning style preferences. Results showed the learning preferences of students in different learning style preference categories.  The data obtained also revealed that a meaningful correlation was found with regard to the difference between the schools graduated and students’ perceptions of learning style preferences.

Keywords: Learning Style, English as a Foreign Language (EFL), Turkish Students


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Yilmaz, C. & Genc, S.Z. (2010). Identifying students’ learning style preferences regarding some variables in the EFL classroom: The case of  Turkey . International Journal of Progressive Education, 6(3), 51-64.

Harvard
Yilmaz, C. and Genc, S. (2010). Identifying students’ learning style preferences regarding some variables in the EFL classroom: The case of  Turkey . International Journal of Progressive Education, 6(3), pp. 51-64.

Chicago 16th edition
Yilmaz, Cevdet and Salih Zeki Genc (2010). "Identifying students’ learning style preferences regarding some variables in the EFL classroom: The case of  Turkey ". International Journal of Progressive Education 6 (3):51-64.

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