International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Volume 5 Issue 1 (February 2009)

Issue Information

Issue Information

pp. i - vi

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Original articles

Shaking the Trees: The Psychology of Collecting in U.S. Newspaper Coverage of the College Admissions  Process

Ronald Bishop

pp. 6 - 23

Abstract

A frame analysis was conducted to explore themes in recent coverage by print  journalists of the college application process, with special attention paid to the use by reporters of “keywords, stock phrases,  stereotyped  images,  sources  of  information, and sentences that provide reinforcing clusters of facts or judgments” (Entman, p. 52) about this experience. The analysis revealed checklist, panic, hunt, and  packaging frames as the experience was reduced to prospective students collecting attractive experiences and cobbling them together into a compelling package. Through these frames, journalists and the experts they consult urge students to focus solely on how their experiences will make them more attractive to universities acting clearly as collectors. All of the parties involved in the college admissions process are collectors,  at least as described by journalists. Students are persuaded that they must begin their collecting early, as early as junior high school. College recruiters and admissions counselors collect worthy students for their  institutions.

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Media and Teaching about the Middle  East

Khodadad Kaviani

pp. 24 - 44

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This qualitative study was conducted in 2006-2007 and found that teachers relied on a variety of readily available media to stay informed about the Middle East and used  some of them in their teaching. Teachers tried to explain to their students that every Middle Eastern Muslim is not a terrorist and Iraq was not behind the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The guiding questions were: (1) What are the sources of news that teachers     use to teach about the Middle East? (2) How do teachers use the media to teach about the Middle East in the post 9/11 schools? Semi-structured interviews were used to  gather data and teachers’ instructional plans were examined. The Uses  and  Gratification theory provided the conceptual framework and data were analyzed using the grounded theory.

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A Comparative Analysis of Assessment and Evaluation Exercises Included in Geography Textbooks Written According to the 2005 Secondary Education Geography Curriculum and Textbooks of the Former Curriculum in   Turkey

Okan Yasar

pp. 45 - 68

Abstract

This study conducts a comparative analysis of  the  assessment  and  evaluation  exercises in the geography textbooks written according to the Secondary Education Geography Curriculum for 2005 in Turkey with those in the former geography textbooks. In this respect, firstly, the assessment and evaluation studies included in geography textbooks written according to the former and the new  geography  curriculum have been analysed in quantitative and qualitative terms, then the development of the new curriculum in terms of assessment and evaluation studies and their application dimension have been identified. The study  has  showed  that assessment and evaluation studies in geography textbooks written according to  the  2005 secondary education geography curriculum had more effective characteristics in terms of their quality and the  inclusion of  different assessment and evaluation tools  and methods compared to assessment and evaluation studies in the textbooks of the former program.

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The Pedagogy of Oppression: A Brief Look at ‘No Child Left Behind’ (Chinese Translation)

Ramin Farahmandpur & Peter McLaren Translated by: Liang Meng

pp. 69 - 77

Abstract

The driving forces behind the recent educational policies of the No Child Left Behind Act passed in 2001 are neoliberal social and  economic  policies  that  favour outsourcing and downsizing methods of production in the name of flexibility and efficiency. Under the neoliberal economic model, schools must perform similarly to corporate entities. Just as the Dow Jones stock indices measure the performance of companies and represent the pulse of Wall Street, so too  the  Adequate  Yearly  Progress Report (AYP) measures and ranks the performance of public schools. One of the most pernicious results of the No Child Left Behind Act is that states can now indefinitely close or restructure “underperforming schools,” those that fail to meet the requirements established by the  AYP.

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